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Barn Door for the Grandson & Granddaughter's bathroom

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  • Barn Door for the Grandson & Granddaughter's bathroom

    I haven't posted any projects in a while, most things I have done weren't really post worthy ... I am now engaged in making a "barndoor" for my daughter's kids.

    This is being made out of big box yellow pine for the "interior" on which she wants to hang a full length mirror and old reclaimed long leaf pine shiplap for the "outside". The build itself isn't really difficult, just have to deal with the old wood and the many imbedded tacks used to tack up tar paper in years past.

    My big concern on this project is WEIGHT! The door is 32"x83"x2.5" after all is said and done ... I did some research on the net regarding weight of wood and best I can figure this puppy will come it somewhere around 220#+ !I did some research on what the hardware of this type used to hang these doors can support and as best as I can determine around 250# is a typical limit. That's cutting it closer than I would like. I built one a while back for our house but it was cedar and not as heavy as this pine, particularly the old reclaimed stuff.

    I used construction adhesive and 18 gauge nails to put things together. I will add some heavier re-enforcing screws where the door hardware rollers will attach to the door to help support the weight.

    They want a moderately dark finish.
    "Like an old desperado, I paint the town beige ..." REK
    Bade Millsap
    Bulverde, Texas
    => Bade's Personal Web Log
    => Bade's Lutherie Web Log

  • #2
    You seem to have overestimated the weight by quite a bit

    Assuming a solid door, the dimensions given = 6640 in^3
    Pine has a density of .018 lbs per in^3 which would yield a maximum of 120 pounds

    Given that the front third and the back third are frames and not solid it should be a lot less than 120 lbs.
    the solid center should weight about 40 lbs

    assuming the frame is 3.5" and 3/4" thick front and back frames should weigh 40 lbs less the total weight of the 3 open areas ( 17 pounds each frame)
    So all told you should be around 74 pounds.(17+40+17)

    If your pine is real dense compared to what I found under just pine on the internet, it may go up some.but not a whole lot.

    That's my calculations anyway.
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-25-2018, 04:56 AM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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    • #3
      I hope you are right about the weight but it sure "feels" heavier than that when I wrangle it around on the work table! I'm not sure what you mean by "frames". The door is solid on both sides with a very thin layer of luan between the yellow pine solid "inside" and the long leaf shiplap pine "outside". Then there are "trim" pieces to give the character and "design" (such as it is) on the "outside". Since the "trim" isn't solid the 2.5" thickness is a little misleading as far as cubic inch calculation. I used this link to calculate weight https://www.betterbuildinghardware.c...ght-calculator ... and I did use "hickory" as the wood vs pine because I found weight estimates for the long leaf that was higher than plain "pine" . As I said I did use the 2.5" thickness in the calculator which I agree is overstated because the "trim" is not solid. All of that being said I just HOPE the hardware can handle the weight.
      "Like an old desperado, I paint the town beige ..." REK
      Bade Millsap
      Bulverde, Texas
      => Bade's Personal Web Log
      => Bade's Lutherie Web Log

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      • #4
        I looked at your picts and recognized the "barn pine", which lookers like what I call "old growth" pine that is much heavier than southern white or other pine. I have some of the old growth pine and it is fairly dense and not like constructions grade pine available today. I have over a dozen 2x4s 6 ft long from old growth heart pine/pitch like pine that is most as heavy as oak. These are much heavier than my construction 2x4s x 8ft from HD or Lowes. My 1x6 and 1x8s by 14 ft & 16 ft long are much heavier than the Lowes/HD stuff

        Your lumber looks like the rare old growth heart pine or sometimes called pitch pine. Quite dense for pine in todays world.
        Hank Lee

        Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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        • #5
          Below is the picture of the old growth pine I picked up.
          Hank Lee

          Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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          • #6
            I looked here. https://www.engineeringtoolbox.com/w...sity-d_40.html
            On the kg/m^3 the range for pine is a low of 350 to 560
            Oaks tend to run 750
            The value I used .018 lbs/in^3 corresponds to 500 kg/m^3 so its at the high end. density for pine species.

            So I think my values are probably right. Even if your pine approaches the density of oak that would be about 50% heavier, my figure of 74 lbs would be 50% higher about 112 lbs.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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            • #7
              My curiosity get the best of me and I stopped what I was doing (bookwork) and went and cut 2 pieces of pine. Old pine and white pine. 2" square and 1 inch thick, both from 2x4s. Both dry - in shed.

              Old pine: 4 cubic inches = 1.4 oz or 40 grams = .35 oz per cubic inch/10 gram per cubic inch

              white pine: from HD same size = 1 oz or 28 grams .25 oz per cubic inch/ 7 gram per cubic inch
              Last edited by leehljp; 09-25-2018, 04:17 PM.
              Hank Lee

              Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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              • LCHIEN
                LCHIEN commented
                Editing a comment
                your old pine equates to .022 lb/in^3
                your new pine equates to 0.0156 lb/in^3
                That straddles the value I used (.018 lb/in^3) to calculate 74 lbs
                Last edited by LCHIEN; 09-27-2018, 03:56 AM.

            • #8
              Wow! You went to a lot of trouble. I'll find a way to weigh the finished door before I hang it and post the weight. It will be a while before I do any additional work. I'm embarking on a 19 day road trip up to Maine to see what Fall looks like... we don't get much color down here in South Central Texas.

              Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk

              "Like an old desperado, I paint the town beige ..." REK
              Bade Millsap
              Bulverde, Texas
              => Bade's Personal Web Log
              => Bade's Lutherie Web Log

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