Ultimate Tool Stand

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  • Cochese
    Veteran Member
    • Jun 2010
    • 1988

    Ultimate Tool Stand

    As discussed in my shop thread, I've been thinking about making this for awhile. Now that I've told my wife my plans to make her a kitchen table for Christmas, I need a large flat workspace in which to do it...which necessitates getting this done rather soon. The plans aren't that detailed when it comes to a step by step manner, but it's been done so many times I don't think that will be an issue.

    Where I see a potential problem/choice is this: the planer. With the tables attached, this thing (my AP1301) is a lot wider than the approx 24" the space will be. I've only ever seen pictures of the UTS made with planers with either no or short tables.

    So, I figure I have two choices:
    1) the first choice, and one I've considered, liked, then not thought so much of, is to make one or two four foot sections of the UTS, instead of the single 6' original plan. The reasoning being, the section that gets removed would be on an end, and I could position the planer so that it would be close to the edge and fit one table inside the box, and then position another table or the other section of UTS (with a gap) so that it would still function correctly as a feed table.

    I have two main problems with doing this, however. At first, I thought it would be good to simply replace my cheap tables with two mini-UTSs, but I remembered I wanted somewhere eventually to practice hand planing and have a nice solid bench to do stuff later. I don't have room for three tables plus a router table (I've put so much work into the RT that I'm not ditching it in favor of the UTS), so I don't like that plan. The other problem is that when I start to modify plans, I usually make math errors of laughable proportions.

    2) the more obvious choice would be to build the stand as directed, and take off the Ryobi's tables. I would then fill-in the space between the cutting surface and the work surface to provide one continuous slab.

    I've read though that a small vee is preferred to prevent runout. How would having a flat surface throughout affect tearout? I'm already getting a bit of that already, and I haven't decided if it's from the tables or the blades.

    I'm probably going to play with Cutlist tonight and figure out exactly how much MDF I'm going to need either way (won't need any of the router items, so I may be able to cut some expense out), so I'd appreciate any help.
    I have a little blog about my shop
  • Cochese
    Veteran Member
    • Jun 2010
    • 1988

    #2
    A quick question: MDF usually comes out as 49x97, correct? Otherwise, I have no idea how they did it with four sheets.
    I have a little blog about my shop

    Comment

    • toolguy1000
      Veteran Member
      • Mar 2009
      • 1142
      • westchester cnty, ny

      #3
      the mdf at the HD is that size.
      there's a solution to every problem.......you just have to be willing to find it.

      Comment

      • lrogers
        Veteran Member
        • Dec 2002
        • 3853
        • Mobile, AL. USA.
        • BT3000

        #4
        Once you have built the torsion box and the main body, you can modify that thing to your hearts content to make it fit your shop/tools. I built one 5-6 years ago and I'm still using it. There are quite a few build pics of it on my webshots page. Yes, as I recall, the MDF is slightly oversized and it is HEAVY! Get good castors, don't skimp here.
        Larry R. Rogers
        The Samurai Wood Butcher
        http://splash54.multiply.com
        http://community.webshots.com/user/splash54

        Comment

        • twistsol
          Veteran Member
          • Dec 2002
          • 2912
          • Cottage Grove, MN, USA.
          • Ridgid R4512, 2x ShopSmith Mark V 520, 1951 Shopsmith 10ER

          #5
          The option I used to solve the planer problem was to make mine 7' long with a 36" center section. I have the DW733 and it is about 34" wide with the tables opened. I should have moved the wheels in from the edge because it has sagged about 1/4 inch in the 7 years since I built it but it also spent a couple years in a very damp garage. I'd second the advice on good casters. The thing is HEAVY when complete.

          I built a second 2' x 7' torsion box as a base for my mobile BT. I tried to open up my old cutlist file to see how many sheets I used, but I keep getting an error.
          Chr's
          __________
          An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
          A moral man does it.

          Comment

          • Cochese
            Veteran Member
            • Jun 2010
            • 1988

            #6
            Unfortunately 6' is about the limit of the room I have, and even that is going to be pushing it.

            The casters will hold 300# each. I hope that's enough. And I also hope from how you're talking that it doesn't go through the floor of my shed. As a matter of fact, they may be the exact same ones as listed in Merrill's list. Peachtree is slightly cheaper than Woodcraft, and when I bought these last time they were half-price. Too bad I can't go back and order four more at that price. Looking a bit closer they aren't quite the same - mine aren't a swivel mount.

            If the weather holds, I'll be picking up the MDF today. I'll wait and see on the planer, I may simply make the tables sit on top of the surface and add an extra temp layer to meet the height.

            I just found a PDF file that I had long forgotten, showing how you can make the end pieces slide apart to accommodate the lunchbox-style planers. I may or may not do this, but it's highly likely that I'll give it a shot.
            Last edited by Cochese; 08-21-2010, 08:31 AM.
            I have a little blog about my shop

            Comment

            • lrogers
              Veteran Member
              • Dec 2002
              • 3853
              • Mobile, AL. USA.
              • BT3000

              #7
              I made the end sections on mine slide apart. It was actually very easy and while I don't expand them often, it is nice when needed.
              Larry R. Rogers
              The Samurai Wood Butcher
              http://splash54.multiply.com
              http://community.webshots.com/user/splash54

              Comment

              • Cochese
                Veteran Member
                • Jun 2010
                • 1988

                #8
                Good Lord I forgot how heavy this stuff is. This is going to put a hole in the world.

                Any reason why I can't use pocket hole joinery? What size screws and which setting? Seems like the standard setting would come through the other side?
                Last edited by Cochese; 08-21-2010, 01:36 PM.
                I have a little blog about my shop

                Comment

                • Cochese
                  Veteran Member
                  • Jun 2010
                  • 1988

                  #9
                  Ran out of time today, due to family obligations. I was hoping to get most of it done this weekend, but I doubt that will happen.

                  Modified the original plans by eliminating the router items. The whole box for the router, and everything to do with the fence. I think this should allow me to cut a whole sheet of MDF out, but we'll find out when all the pieces are cut. Got 4/6 of the 24x24 pieces done (the tops and bottoms of the boxes), and have the long pieces cut to the correct length, but I haven't cut them to the correct depth. I had wanted to cut these on the table, but they are way too big and heavy. Building this UTS might give me that option when it's done.

                  Hopefully tomorrow I can get those long pieces cut down to size, get the other two 24x24 pieces done, and at least cut and assemble the torsion box so I can see what I need to do in the workshop to make room for it.

                  I'm unfortunately left to leave the MDF outside in the carport overnight, because I wasn't able to cut more. It's all sorts of humid, but there's nothing I can do about it. Once it gets assembled it's getting a coat of paint.
                  I have a little blog about my shop

                  Comment

                  • Cochese
                    Veteran Member
                    • Jun 2010
                    • 1988

                    #10
                    Except for the four vertical pieces and the back hardboard, everything is cut to size. In a bit, I'm going to attempt the dadoes for the torsion box and perhaps I'll take a few pictures.
                    I have a little blog about my shop

                    Comment

                    • Cochese
                      Veteran Member
                      • Jun 2010
                      • 1988

                      #11
                      I'm having some mighty trouble getting the torsion box put together. It' not going together well at all. I'm having to use clamps to get each individual rib in, and when they are in I have a cup in the short pieces.

                      Should I add a shim to my dado stack and widen the dados on the short cross pieces and try again?
                      I have a little blog about my shop

                      Comment

                      • twistsol
                        Veteran Member
                        • Dec 2002
                        • 2912
                        • Cottage Grove, MN, USA.
                        • Ridgid R4512, 2x ShopSmith Mark V 520, 1951 Shopsmith 10ER

                        #12
                        I had that same problem initially and yes, add a shim. The parts should be snug, but not deform when you put them together. Mine were so tight, I broke a couple of the pieces.
                        Chr's
                        __________
                        An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
                        A moral man does it.

                        Comment

                        • Cochese
                          Veteran Member
                          • Jun 2010
                          • 1988

                          #13
                          I broke three. Turns out the 3/4" stack was just shy of 3/4". Added a shim, and they fit together much better, but still prone to break.

                          Torsion box is pretty much done. I'm hoping to get at least one of the boxes done before I have to pack up for the day.
                          I have a little blog about my shop

                          Comment

                          • Cochese
                            Veteran Member
                            • Jun 2010
                            • 1988

                            #14
                            I've hit a problem. A fairly big one, to be honest.

                            I got the torsion box, the carcass and the upper boxes done since last I posted. I put on temporary casters and today I replaced those with some beefy ones. While I was doing so, I noticed that there was some pretty noticeable sag in the middle. I had put my planer inside the carcass at one end, and a couple of tubs that didn't weigh too much on top. This thing is sagging under it's own weight. And as a glueup table, this isn't acceptable.

                            So, I'm looking for solutions. One would be to do the torsion box over and see if that fixes it. The other that I can think of is to put some dimensional lumber underneath the middle and shim it back up to level. I'd obviously have to readjust it if I move it. If I redo the torsion box, I'm not keen on doing it again with MDF. I'd almost rather do it with cabinet grade ply. Advantage? Disadvantage?

                            Thoughts? Otherwise, the project is steadily progressing. I'm drilling holes for the sanding box, and I'm about half done with just the drilling. I might need to expand the holes, though. What size bit should I use?
                            I have a little blog about my shop

                            Comment

                            • JimD
                              Veteran Member
                              • Feb 2003
                              • 4187
                              • Lexington, SC.

                              #15
                              Why not just put more casters in the middle to cut the span in half?

                              I use my outfeed table and the top of the BT3100 (with it's extension table) for glueup of large pieces. Or I clear out a space and do it on the floor. My outfeed table is my glueup/handwork table, in other words.

                              Jim

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