How to paint my LVL workbench base?

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  • How to paint my LVL workbench base?

    I spent a few hours this weekend building the bottom to my LVL (Laminated Veneer Lumber) workbench. LVL is commonly used for things like overhead garage door headers. Strong. Not too expensive (this base was approx. $70 with plenty of good-sized leftovers). And incredibly stable. I plan on using a solid-core door for the top.

    Each stretcher joint connects with two 1/2" dowels and a 1/2" x 4" long hex-head bolt threaded into a 1/2" wing-nut used as a cross-dowel. Very sturdy. I put all my weight on the middle of the 5-1/2" wide stretcher and it didn't deflect.

    I would like to paint the base. First of all, the surface isn't perfectly smooth. Perhaps I should swipe a layer of auto-body filler on the faces before painting? That should fill any defects. Would auto-body filler work okay for this? I've never used auto-body filler, is there some specific brand/type I should use, that I can pickup locally? I also have Durhams Rock-Hard Water Putty. Would one or the other be more likely to pop-out? I imagine the auto-body filler would stick better. Do I need two-part auto-body filler? Or is there a one-part product that would work?

    Now for paint. Oil or latex? What kind of primer? Brush, or roller? Can I get away with cans of spray paint or would that be inefficient compared to can/brush? I have recently used Dutch Boy kitchen cabinet paint (latex) that is non-blocking (doesn't stick) on some shelves and it seemed to work okay, but I don't know how durable it is. I would imagine oil-based products are more durable.

    Any and all advice for painting is welcome.
    Attached Files

  • #2
    Here I am replying to my own question. I did some searching for paint finishes here and found someone mention floor or porch paint. Is that pretty durable stuff? More so than cabinet paint? Behr and Dutch Boy seem to indicate their floor paints are latex. Exactly how much difference is there within a line of latex paints, in terms of durability?

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    • #3
      You can use spray primer and spray enamel. It will work but it will cost you. Brush on will cover better. Do not use house paint. It never really gets hard, even after it dries.
      spellling champion Lexington region 1982

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      • #4
        I've made quite a few bases and tables that I've painted. I use Behr Porch and Floor. In the case of your widths, a 2 1/2" angled sash brush would be best IMO. The P & F is thick. You could prime it as it is a form of ply, but extra coats of the latex paint will act as a primer. The Behr P & F has been my choice for all my home-made tool cabinets, assembly tables, etc.

        Regards...
        Attached Files

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        • #5
          Originally posted by SARGE..g-47
          I've made quite a few bases and tables that I've painted. I use Behr Porch and Floor. In the case of your widths, a 2 1/2" angled sash brush would be best IMO. The P & F is thick. You could prime it as it is a form of ply, but extra coats of the latex paint will act as a primer. The Behr P & F has been my choice for all my home-made tool cabinets, assembly tables, etc.

          Regards...
          Did you use low-lustre or gloss? And the Behr site indicates this is a latex product, that is what you used, right?

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          • #6
            I usually use gloss as it is more resistant to staining and the slicker surface won't attract dust as bad. Yes... it is latex and you will end up with a very hard surface, durable finish after several coats.

            You might want to give some early coats to the open grain of that ply you laminated. It is going to suck up some paint before it gets to a point that all is even.

            Sorry to take so long to answer. I work odd hours and have several things working at once most of the time.

            BTW.. that base you built is well done, CG. Good luck with the project and if ya need anything.. give a shout.

            Regards...

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            • #7
              Originally posted by SARGE..g-47
              I usually use gloss as it is more resistant to staining and the slicker surface won't attract dust as bad. Yes... it is latex and you will end up with a very hard surface, durable finish after several coats.

              You might want to give some early coats to the open grain of that ply you laminated. It is going to suck up some paint before it gets to a point that all is even.

              Sorry to take so long to answer. I work odd hours and have several things working at once most of the time.

              BTW.. that base you built is well done, CG. Good luck with the project and if ya need anything.. give a shout.

              Regards...
              Thanks Sarge. I purchased Dutch Boy semi-gloss porch and floor enamel (latex) paint today at Menards (I like the plastic jugs Dutch Boy uses). I rolled a coat of primer on earlier and this evening I started the porch paint. Very thick stuff. I'd almost say goopy, but there are no lumps. :-)

              I'm going to roll/brush two to three thin coats on. I know it is just a bench, but I figured I'd do as good a job as I have time.

              All I gotta do is get my door for the top, and I plan on building some cabinets that will sit on the stretchers and provide some additional support to the top from underneath.

              Thanks for all the help!

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              • #8
                When you get a good base coat built up, I would brush that last coat. But, I would scuff it slighty with 180-220 grit b-4 that last coat to get some adhesion. Just as you would tween coats of poly or b-4 application of auto paint on primer.

                Keep up the good work and positive attitude..

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