Start of a new remodel project

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  • #16
    One of the reasons for permitting work on homes in addition to meeting code for safety reasons, is so that the tax office can get wind of improvements and increase the assessed value of the property,
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

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    • #17
      Yep, speed trap by another name. ***********s

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      • #18
        Well, I got a good result this afternoon. I emailed the plan reviewer today including the email from the other inspector. He called me back in 30min and was very helpful. He didn't say one way or another whether I'd HAVE to drill into the existing footer and add rebar, but did suggest it as the best solution. He did acknowledge that the existing footer didn't have a smooth face and that even with a cold joint to the new concrete, it would probably be OK. He also said it might have been some automation that added the electrical permit requirement and to mention it when I submitted the revision and they'd take it off. So I'm very pleased with the turnaround and reasonableness of the response.

        I requested the footer inspection for next Wednesday morning.

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        • capncarl
          capncarl commented
          Editing a comment
          Drilling into the existing footer is the best way of attaching it. Ever thought of how they repair a section of roadway like interstate highways? Saw cut the bad section chop the old out, Drill into the existing and insert rebar, usually lots of rebar. A couple of squirts of epoxy in each hole before the rebar too.

        • capncarl
          capncarl commented
          Editing a comment
          Oh, if you are going to pour the footer yourself? Concrete is very heavy, and it will take a lot of bags and will get real heavy getting them under the house!

        • atgcpaul
          atgcpaul commented
          Editing a comment
          You're right. My concern is hitting existing rebar as I drill. I need to find a tool rental place.

          Oh, I know how heavy that concrete is. I've got 4 80# bags (not the rapid set kind) waiting right outside the crawlspace door. The new footer is maybe 6ft from that door so I'll mix it up in the larger space and use a bucket to carry it to the footer. Now, if the cargo ship carrying my last shipment would just get hit, I have a short shovel in there that would be perfect in the crawlspace and I would do all my mixing right in there. It's a tall "crawlspace" so it's more like a "hunchspace".

          I had to pour a stair landing at my old house that was 3ft deep, 3ft long, and 1ft wide. THAT was a lot of concrete to mix by hand!
          Last edited by atgcpaul; 09-30-2022, 04:21 PM. Reason: 4 bags, not 3!

      • #19
        The post column and LVLs are ordered. I couldn't find LVL beam specs on the HD website or at another local-ish supplier. I was rerouting to a lumber supplier this morning when I passed a HUGE lumber yard tucked off the main road. Anyway, they had the LVLs I need and will deliver next Wednesday. They are less than 5 miles from my house so no extra delivery fee.

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        • capncarl
          capncarl commented
          Editing a comment
          I recently purchased a pretty decent hammer drill at HF for about $45. Probably cheaper than a rental.

        • atgcpaul
          atgcpaul commented
          Editing a comment
          I remembered this morning my new Ridgid is a hammer drill. I bought a 5/8" Bosch bit this morning at Lowe's for hammer drills. I'll give it a go tomorrow morning. I also bought the epoxy and 6 pieces of 1/2" rebar. Assuming the bit and drill work out, I'll have the rebar and epoxy available to show the inspector.

          The tube of epoxy came with 2 tips. I hope that means I don't have to use it all at once. The post column base plate has 4 holes. I was thinking to set 4 threaded J-bolts in the pour, but that seems really tricky to make sure everything is lined up. If the Ridgid does its job, then I plan to get another appropriately sized bit and drill for threaded rod using the remaining epoxy. It was almost $30/tube!

      • #20
        I'm exhausted.

        I woke up at 5, had coffee and breakfast, watched a bunch of shed building YouTubes, and basically waited for my wife to get up so then I wouldn't get in trouble for making noise.

        First stop was the attic to pull up the dead wires I found in the wall and shove them in a junction box. I found another dead box up there, too.

        Then I got down to the crawlspace and drilled holes for the rebar. That's definitely a respirator, padded gloves, and hearing protection required job. I got 4 done almost 6" deep and I'm happy with that. The new concrete is going to flow under the existing footer, too, and be pinned there. I'm impressed enough with the Ridgid hammer drill. I used up 1 1/2 4Ah batteries and the drill did shut down on my last hole because of overheating, but the drill and a $15 bit got it done. Don't mind the wonky first rebar. It's going to beaten in line. Today I'll scribe my form to fit the footer, pin it with some rebar and backfill around it to make it ready for inspection.

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        • #21
          County inspector came this morning and even before he entered mentioned that he didn't even think the inspection was necessary . Anyway, he humored me and took a look at the footer. All good. I got a passing sticker.

          I also received the support column by UPS yesterday and 30min ago took delivery of the 2 20' LVLs I ordered last week.

          I measured thrice before cutting each in half to bring them inside the garage to dry out.

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          • #22
            I wanted to hang some siding on my shed today, but I decided to work inside the house first and let it heat up outside. I foolishly thought I'd be done around lunch and could go outside. Ha!

            I permanently installed the support column in the crawlspace first. Easy enough. I got cocky.

            I didn't want to buy more 2s than I needed. The shed wall studs are shorter than the temporary wall studs so before I put up all my shed walls, I needed to erect the temporary walls and install my beams.

            I started on the living room wall and setup two horizontal braces between my temp wall and the studs on the kitchen wall. This let me lift a single glulam onto the supports by myself--each wall needs 2. With the second glulam on, I could then screw them together, and use a hydraulic car jack to lift it into place. After I finished one wall, I took down the temp wall, and set it up again in the kitchen.

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            I was a bit nervous removing the temp walls but I don't hear any groans from the house.

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            There's an opening to the right of this new opening that I'm closing off. I have to do that and then I'm ready for the framing inspection.

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            • #23
              How do you think I should tackle the flooring? This is how the previous homeowner transitioned between the two rooms in a different doorway. My wife hates it.

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              I now have two doorways to patch in. Fortunately the PO also left behind all the extra flooring and stain. For both I was thinking to cut a slight bevel on the existing floor with my tracksaw. Then pre-gluing the new patch together and cutting the matching bevel (trapezoid on end). Finally drop it in place with glue (not on the cross-grain side) and some brads.

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              • atgcpaul
                atgcpaul commented
                Editing a comment
                We may end up refinishing the whole floor. From 5' off the ground, the floor looks good, but when you get down close, there are lots of scratches (some from my construction) The renters also damaged and tried to poorly fix two largish (1' and 6" circles) spots on the floor so all that wood needs to be replaced/refinished.

                We just have very little motivation to move all the furniture again.

              • LCHIEN
                LCHIEN commented
                Editing a comment
                how unfortunate the grain runs at right angles in the now two adjoining rooms. just looks strange and like a very obvious non-matching work.

              • atgcpaul
                atgcpaul commented
                Editing a comment
                Loring, agreed, but we'll live with it.

            • #24
              Friends of mine that have repaired and refinished their hardwood floors have contributed a large percentage of damage to dog claws. All the clicking while they run through your living room is scratching the floor! One friend reported that a renter allowed their kids to roller skate in the house. It was an older 1600 sf house with 3/4” thick tounge groove and hardwood throughout. Their floor repair bill was actually more than the house sold for new in the 1950s.

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              • atgcpaul
                atgcpaul commented
                Editing a comment
                I don't doubt it Our property manager got a quote of $1000+ to repair the two spots on our floor. The last renters had a dog and a cat, and it's probably cat pee that stained the oak floor.
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