Bosh Table Saw (won't working)

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  • Bosh Table Saw (won't working)

    The Bosch Table Saw won’t work, it does not turn on. I tried turning it on but nothing happens, no lights or anything. I am not sure what is going on with it.

    "If your Bosch cord or outlet has stopped working,, the next thing to do is find a different outlet or check if the cord has been damaged."
    I took the above statement from the manual. Unfortunately I couldn't find a solution to my problem. What are the recommended table saws you use?

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    Last edited by lockwood01; 07-17-2022, 01:56 PM. Reason: punctuation correction

  • #2
    Giving that this forum started off as bt3central.com focused on the Ryobi BT3000, BT3100 and related saws also known as the BT3x00, the reccommended saw is obviously going to be the BT3x00, however those Bosch job site saws are nice in their own right, so why not try to figure out what is going on with it? No sense in throwing it out if it can be recovered and still used after all!

    Without having a manual on the saw, or great eyesight to see details in your pic, sorry I am not wearing my glasses right now... I can't tell if your switch is supposed to have a lockout key in it, but I do not see a yellow lockout key in place. Depending on the switch design, I would expect to see something like the yellow part in the switch shown below... (That is a generic version of the style of switch newer Ryobi saws use, as well as a mess of other MFGs...) There are two main styles of modern safety switches for table saws, and both include a lockout. The other kind that has the red key are typically more of a toggle switch where the key inserts into the, well, nose of the switch...

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    Switches themselves go bad. That would be a good place to test. Cords get damaged, do you have continuity from the pin ends through to the switch?

    And the obvious one, does the outlet you are trying to use have power? Have you plugged in and tested with something like a lamp, radio, drill or whatever?

    With the saw unplugged, does the arbor, the part the blade is mounted on, spin freely?

    Are you hearing any humming noises like the motor is trying to start but won't?
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    • #3
      Originally posted by dbhost View Post

      And the obvious one, does the outlet you are trying to use have power? Have you plugged in and tested with something like a lamp, radio, drill or whatever?

      With the saw unplugged, does the arbor, the part the blade is mounted on, spin freely?

      Are you hearing any humming noises like the motor is trying to start but won't?
      -The outlet I am trying to use has power. Yes, I tested this with my different hand tools.

      -Yes, it's spinning.

      -Yes, I am getting exactly these humming noises.

      Thank you for your kindness. I wanted to understand the problem and share it so that I can achieve it myself. Thank you...

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      • #4
        Some Bosch portable/benchtop table saws include a soft-start electronic circuit, similar to modern woodworking routers. If that circuit board fails, the motor never gets proper working voltage and likely won't run. Giving the blade a nudge, in the normal rotation direction, with a dowel or wood stick might help it get started... but I'll bet it won't reach full speed even if it begins running. Without a wiring diagram and an AC voltmeter, it would be hard to test the circuit board. The "process of elimination" - making sure everything else such as the power cord, power switch, the motor, etc. work properly - is the alternative.

        Look for any fuses and circuit breakers on the motor itself, on the circuit board, and on the saw body/case. Make sure they're not blown/popped. If you can see the circuit board (probably have to remove the bottom panel on the saw) look at the electrolytic capacitors. They will be cylinder shaped objects either standing perpendicular to the circuit board itself (like grain silos) or laying on their sides (like a piece of pipe) with a wire at each end going to the circuit board. Look carefully at the shape, especially if the capacitor is standing perpendicular to the circuit board: look for signs of bulges in the sides or especially in the top. Many capacitors have an "X" shape embossed in their tops; the overall top should be flat except for the "X" itself... if the that top area is at all domed/bulged then the capacitor is definitely bad and could be the problem. Replacing such capacitors is easy for anybody with electronics and soldering experience... or you can buy a complete replacement circuit board from Bosch or a repair parts supplier. Look for signs of burning/charring on the circuit board too. Light brown staining is common from heat; dark brown or black though means some electronic part overheated and died. You may see transistors on the circuit board, or attached to finned metal heat sinks. Look closely at them for signs of overheating/melting and look for wire leads on all electronic parts that may have busted (like a blown fuse) from an overload or other issue. Sometimes the circuit board itself will have blown/fried copper traces from overloads.

        It probably wouldn't hurt to send Bosch technical/customer support an email describing your problem, especially if you find problems on the circuit board. They may say it was a known problem or design deficiency and offer a free replacement circuit board even if the saw is out of warranty. You've got nothing to loose but a few minutes time. If you think you see something damaged, include a picture of the damage with the email. Include the saw model number, serial number, and any manufacturing date you can f ind as part of the email too so they know exactly what saw you have.

        mpc

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        • #5
          Originally posted by mpc View Post
          Some Bosch portable/benchtop table saws include a soft-start electronic circuit, similar to modern woodworking routers. If that circuit board fails, the motor never gets proper working voltage and likely won't run. Giving the blade a nudge, in the normal rotation direction, with a dowel or wood stick might help it get started... but I'll bet it won't reach full speed even if it begins running. Without a wiring diagram and an AC voltmeter, it would be hard to test the circuit board. The "process of elimination" - making sure everything else such as the power cord, power switch, the motor, etc. work properly - is the alternative.

          Look for any fuses and circuit breakers on the motor itself, on the circuit board, and on the saw body/case. Make sure they're not blown/popped. If you can see the circuit board (probably have to remove the bottom panel on the saw) look at the electrolytic capacitors. They will be cylinder shaped objects either standing perpendicular to the circuit board itself (like grain silos) or laying on their sides (like a piece of pipe) with a wire at each end going to the circuit board. Look carefully at the shape, especially if the capacitor is standing perpendicular to the circuit board: look for signs of bulges in the sides or especially in the top. Many capacitors have an "X" shape embossed in their tops; the overall top should be flat except for the "X" itself... if the that top area is at all domed/bulged then the capacitor is definitely bad and could be the problem. Replacing such capacitors is easy for anybody with electronics and soldering experience... or you can buy a complete replacement circuit board from Bosch or a repair parts supplier. Look for signs of burning/charring on the circuit board too. Light brown staining is common from heat; dark brown or black though means some electronic part overheated and died. You may see transistors on the circuit board, or attached to finned metal heat sinks. Look closely at them for signs of overheating/melting and look for wire leads on all electronic parts that may have busted (like a blown fuse) from an overload or other issue. Sometimes the circuit board itself will have blown/fried copper traces from overloads.

          It probably wouldn't hurt to send Bosch technical/customer support an email describing your problem, especially if you find problems on the circuit board. They may say it was a known problem or design deficiency and offer a free replacement circuit board even if the saw is out of warranty. You've got nothing to loose but a few minutes time. If you think you see something damaged, include a picture of the damage with the email. Include the saw model number, serial number, and any manufacturing date you can f ind as part of the email too so they know exactly what saw you have.

          mpc
          Thank you, but I have found the problem and am about to fix it. I'll surely bring an update on how I solved it. Maybe it will be a reference for some. Thanks for your detailed solution suggestions. Cheers!

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