Christmas present, compressed air piping system installed,

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  • Christmas present, compressed air piping system installed,

    The compressed air piping system install, and overhead hose reel installation is done!

    Not counting the compressors themselves, and the manifold assembly / filter / dryer units which I have had for going on a decade now, and misc bits and bobs here and there scrounged up from my old stuff drawers, Since it was chosen by me as a black friday thing for a Christmas present, I can say with utmost certainty I have less than $70.00 in the entire rig. Considering my setup, and the pieces that would need to be added to a rapidaire system, I am EASILY at around 1/2 the cost if not less... Only time will tell if it will hold up as well.

    For a full writeup with photos, please see my blogger page at https://www.daves-workshop.com/2022/...essed-air.html

    Now first things first. I KNOW I haven't used my DC as much as I should. It is DUSTY, hence why I am getting so OCD about dust collection lately...

    The 29 gallon compressor and the first connection to the system.



    The manifold assembly, with regulator, filter, dryer, plumbed connection to the compressors, and hard out, and a quick connect out.




    Where the first turn is made. Those push to connect fittings are SUPER easy! Makes sharkbite look difficult.




    The hose reel squeezed in there between the overhead doors. It is a tight fit, but it goes and nothing interferes.




    The finished outlet block assembly. Instead of tilted at an angle like Rapidaire does. I wanted to come straight out, so I did...



    As you can see from the pics, I need to tidy up a bit by adding a few more straps to secure it to the ceiling and keep it tight, but overall, it is a done deal and ready for use. It holds pressure perfectly without any notable leakage.
    Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

  • #2
    Oh, that is nice, and I didn't realize that tubing was so affordable. Nice job.

    We use the smaller diameter (1/4" and 3/8") tubing in our lab for all our instruments and it's nice to be able to place them anywhere. However, it's not so good when you have to disconnect and reconnect. The ends get squeezed down and then leak when you try to reuse them. We just trim a little off to get a fresh end.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
      Oh, that is nice, and I didn't realize that tubing was so affordable. Nice job.

      We use the smaller diameter (1/4" and 3/8") tubing in our lab for all our instruments and it's nice to be able to place them anywhere. However, it's not so good when you have to disconnect and reconnect. The ends get squeezed down and then leak when you try to reuse them. We just trim a little off to get a fresh end.
      The kit, minus the outlet blocks, was $30.00, the blocks were $18.00 for 2, and the rest of the bits and bobs ran maybe another $10.00. I tend to carry a reasonable amount of 1/4" and 3/8" NPT fittings in my toolbox. All told I have around $60.00 into the whole shebang, minus taxes of course. I would have had to add other bits and bobs to a Rapidaire setup and would have ended up at around $150.00. Most notably a number of additional push to connect fittings, I think it came out to be,and would have ended up with WAY more tubing than I could ever use.
      Last edited by dbhost; 01-08-2022, 09:06 PM.
      Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

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      • capncarl
        capncarl commented
        Editing a comment
        Is the tubing 1/2” id?

      • dbhost

        dbhost
        commented
        Editing a comment
        Technically it is tubing, so it is measured in OD, pipe is measured in ID, so no. It is 3/8" ID, which will flow according to the charts I have seen 24 CFM, which is way more than the combined compressors max delivery of 14.1 CFM, so not super worried about it.

        At some point my 29 gallon compressor is gonna bite the dust, and I am figuring on picking up a 3HP 60 gallon at that point. IF the specs on those are similar to the ones I have looked at, most notably Ingersoll Rand, they should still give a max CFM of around 18 to 20.

        I have one tool and only one that flows more than my 29 gallon compressor can produce, and that is the texture gun. The 29 gallon compressor is rated at 7.3 CFM. HOWEVER, the pressure for the hopper gun is super low anyway, like 20 - 30, and I have run it off of the 8 gallon comrpessor before. The specs in the manual are just whacked.

    • #4
      I should mention, this filter / regulator setup, was literally shown in every single manual for every spray gun I own, the HF siphon feed, the Husky siphon feed, the HF HVLP, and the HF texture hopper gun...

      Only difference is that they show a filter first, then filter / dryer, THEN regulator. I went with a filter / regulator, then filter dryer. I didn't see a need to have the first filter and regulator be 2 separate units and even less sense in it being after the filtration / water sepatation...


      Last edited by dbhost; 01-09-2022, 02:04 AM.
      Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

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