ShopNotes Drum Sander Complete!

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  • ShopNotes Drum Sander Complete!

    This has been in progress for about 3 weeks now. I'm happy with the results and I'm glad I left it as-is from the ShopNotes plans. Sometimes it's nice to just works from plans. I don't have to think as hard. Building your own drum sander may sound extreme for some, but it's been fun and I'm glad I built myself something finally. While I build boxes or cradles for other folks, I seem to build shop stuff for myself. This one is red like my other miter station and mobile BT.

    This one came in pretty cheap really. I didn't buy any sheet goods for it except for $15 worth of Baltic Birch. It was all "scraps" otherwise. Hardware was about $100. Steel bars, knobs, handles, sandpaper belts, hinges, paint, etc. I'd say it's about $160 or so, YMMV. I may have been able to buy a small used drum sander at that price, I kind of doubt it. I have another motor to make it standalone but I'm running it on the BT for "testing"..

    I didn't work on it constantly during that time. You can't really, this is Arizona and summer so 30 minutes out on the shop is all I can handle before warping the MDF from sweating on it. Just every day or so, I tried to get something done on it.

    I just finished up the dust collection and final bits and pieces. I ran through stock of varying thickness to see how it worked. I didn't build a manual for it so I have to learn as I go. I goofed a little and didn't think far enough ahead when buying sandpaper for the drum. I should have gotten some 80 or lower and some 100. I only got 120 so it's slow going as a thickness sander. As a finish sander it's great.

    The sander as-built is part power tool, part hand tool. Because of the crank handle for the conveyor, you are an integral part of the workings of the machine. Pretty cool. The downside is you are an integral part of the workings of the machine. You must run the stock through at a constant pace to get good results. Itís only a big deal during those last few passes. I'm looking for parts to motorize the conveyor. Until then I don't mind really.

    This was my largest undertaking to date from a ShopNotes project. I found their article to be very helpful during the construction.

    Gory Details and more pictures at: http://billswood.blogspot.com/


    Bill
    Attached Files
    "Why are there Braille codes on drive-up ATM machines?"

  • #2
    That looks great Bill! That has been on my list for a long time.
    Scott
    "The Laminate Flooring Benchtop Guy"

    Edmonds WA

    No coffee, no worky!

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    • #3
      You're a lot more ambitious than I, Bill!
      Don, aka Pappy,

      Wise men talk because they have something to say,
      Fools because they have to say something.
      Plato

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      • #4
        That was quite a project Bill. It will be interesting to see how it "evolves" as you start using it; keep us posted.
        Larry R. Rogers
        The Samurai Wood Butcher
        http://splash54.multiply.com
        http://community.webshots.com/user/splash54

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        • #5
          Nicely done Bill. Don't know if I could have done that.
          Ken Weaver
          Clemson, SC

          "A mistake is absolute proof that someone tried to do something!

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          • #6
            Excellent work Bill. You should be proud of it.
            Ken aka "mater"

            " People may doubt what you say but they will never doubt what you do "

            Ken's Den

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            • #7
              That's excellent, Bill! I'm not sure I would have the cojones to tackle that project.

              I do want a drum sander, but I may wuss out and just buy one.
              Aaron Fleischer
              Orange County Woodworker's Association - Webmaster
              Fleischer Woodworks

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              • #8
                Thanks for the kind words guys.

                I think it's a much more do-able project some might think. It's a woodworking machine sure, but broken down it's an assembly of various parts. Those parts are a collection of elements that on their own, aren't to tough to build. Some circles, dados, grooves, and holes in wood are things that I think most everyone here has done.

                It does require patience in order to put something together and take it apart again, over and over in order to get things to fit together correctly. But thatís half the fun, right?

                All-in-all, this took less time than I thought. Works better than I thought it would and was more enjoyable to build than I thought it would be. My hope is to inspire others to consider building one for themselves.



                -Carzy
                "Why are there Braille codes on drive-up ATM machines?"

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                • #9
                  Where did you get the plans? I definitely like to DIY as much as possible, and this seems like an interesting way to get a useful piece of machinery on the cheap...
                  Last edited by BigguyZ; 08-11-2006, 10:31 AM.

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                  • #10
                    Super job Bill, maybe I won't sell the rest of my BT. Pat
                    Woodworking is therapy.....some of us need more therapy than others. <ZERO>

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                    • #11
                      Hey Popeye, maybe your BT will have a second life..

                      Plans can be found here:http://plansnow.com/dn3078.html

                      I subscribe to Shopnotes so I didn't actually buy them off the website.


                      Bill
                      "Why are there Braille codes on drive-up ATM machines?"

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                      • #12
                        Really sweet, Bill.

                        I'm planning on starting mine in a couple of weeks when it cools down a bit. (It's not the heat; the humidity will drown you.)

                        Can I pick your brain when the time comes?

                        g.
                        Smit

                        "Be excellent to each other."
                        Bill & Ted

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                        • #13
                          looks nice.
                          Alex

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                          • #14
                            Excellent work Bill! That will be one of my winter projects. Having your photographs and information will make it so much easier for me. Thanks for taking the time to explain what you did.

                            Ray

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                            • #15
                              Really sweet, Bill.

                              I'm planning on starting mine in a couple of weeks when it cools down a bit. (It's not the heat; the humidity will drown you.)

                              Can I pick your brain when the time comes?

                              g.
                              Pick away. Best to wait until it does cool down. Here in AZ I could only work for short periods before giving in to the heat. MDF doesn't like sweat.

                              Excellent work Bill! That will be one of my winter projects. Having your photographs and information will make it so much easier for me. Thanks for taking the time to explain what you did.

                              Ray
                              I hope it turns out well for you. (winter I mean)



                              Bill
                              "Why are there Braille codes on drive-up ATM machines?"

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