Delta 36-717 Hybrid/Biese

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  • Delta 36-717 Hybrid/Biese

    Here it is: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00...lance&n=228013

    Add to the cart to see the price of $664. It does incur a $99 shipping charge, but the 10% discount should help offset that.
    If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space.

  • #2
    That is a killer price, but a lot of folks don't like the saw. I ignore the difficult set up complaints since I think price savings is worth the extra difficulty setting it up. After all you only set it up once (hopefully). However, the on going problems reports in other forums are a concern.
    Still seems like a lot of bang for the buck . . .

    Comment


    • #3
      I bought that model back in January for $839 delivered to the shop door and thought (and still do) that I got one heck of a deal. That sale price is sweet!
      From the NW corner of Montana.
      http://www.elksigndesigns.com

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      • #4
        I got mine for $749. That's a sweet deal. I love mine.
        Scott
        "The Laminate Flooring Benchtop Guy"

        Edmonds WA

        No coffee, no worky!

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Jeffrey Schronce
          That is a killer price, but a lot of folks don't like the saw. I ignore the difficult set up complaints since I think price savings is worth the extra difficulty setting it up. After all you only set it up once (hopefully). However, the on going problems reports in other forums are a concern.
          Still seems like a lot of bang for the buck . . .
          Hi Jeffrey - I haven't read many complaints from actual owners on the forums. Most owners seem to post positives around these boards. I know Amazon had a couple of less than flattering reviews, but the saw has alot in common with the 22124 which is getting raves, so it doesn't make sense to one model gets slammed and the other gets accollades. Two possibilities come to mind for those Amazon reviews....either there was trouble with some early models (...remember how late they were with their release?), or someone had an axe to grind on Amazon and expressed themselves there....there's not much required to write an Amazon review, and if you have multiple accounts you can write multiple reviews and there's not much accountability. I prefer Epinions reviews b/c they're a bit more involved. That's why I take them all with a grain of salt...even the mag comments.
          Last edited by Knottscott; 04-29-2006, 04:04 PM.
          Happiness is sort of like wetting your pants....everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth.

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          • #6
            This is a great deal on a nice saw. I was one of the early buyers of this saw and waited many months to see mine. But, I'm happy with it - very. The setup was not that bad and my table alignment from the factory was near perfect - about .001" off on the miter to the blade front to back. The only problem I have is some pretty bad vibration on shut-down; I'm hoping to see this decrease as the belt gets broken in a bit. This price stings a little because I did pay more but I'm very happy for others to take advantage of this one!!

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            • #7
              The only difference I see between my craftsman and that one is the legs. I dont have em. Mine also vibrates quite a bit after I kill the power and the blade begins to slow.
              Dont know why it does it but assumed it was normal????
              YOU DONT HAVE TO TRAIN TO BE MISERABLE. YOU HAVE TO TRAIN TO ENDURE MISERY.

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              • #8
                I think that one of the big differences between the Delta and the Craftsman is that the Craftsman has cabinet mounted trunions. The Delta has table mounted trunions....much like a contractor saw. I think the cabinet mounted trunions are a lot easier for initial tuning and truing the miter slot to the blade. After the initial setup....I don't know if it makes a difference.
                If you're not living on the edge, you're taking up too much space.

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                • #9
                  I saw this deal posted over on woodnet and jumped all over it. This is the kind of deal I've been waiting for....fits my budget perfectly.

                  By the way, I checked out the online manual but did not see instructions for rewiring to 220. Can any of you owners tell me if it comes with rewiring instructions?

                  Thanks,
                  Vinh
                  A Woodworker\'s Journey
                  http://vinht.home.comcast.net

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by coach
                    I think that one of the big differences between the Delta and the Craftsman is that the Craftsman has cabinet mounted trunions. The Delta has table mounted trunions....much like a contractor saw. I think the cabinet mounted trunions are a lot easier for initial tuning and truing the miter slot to the blade. After the initial setup....I don't know if it makes a difference.
                    I know the Craftsman has 12" wings...it'd be interesting if someone would measure their 36-71X wings and post here. Other differences I know of are that the motor cover on the 36-71X is metal and not plastic. The 22124 has a miter gauge fence, and the Leitz 40T blade, but I think the motor, motor mount, belt, pulleys, on/off switch, and wrenches are the same. Anyone know if the throat plates are the same? A left tilt Uni insert will fit my 22124....13-3/8" x 3-3/4" x 1/2".

                    Vin - You should find the schematic in the wiring junction box on the motor.
                    Happiness is sort of like wetting your pants....everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dustmight
                      I know the Craftsman has 12" wings...it'd be interesting if someone would measure their 36-71X wings and post here.
                      10-3/16's here.
                      From the NW corner of Montana.
                      http://www.elksigndesigns.com

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Stan
                        10-3/16's here.
                        Thanks....told ya that'd be interesting! What a rush!
                        Happiness is sort of like wetting your pants....everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth.

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                        • #13
                          heh, glad I could help out.
                          From the NW corner of Montana.
                          http://www.elksigndesigns.com

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by vinht

                            By the way, I checked out the online manual but did not see instructions for rewiring to 220. Can any of you owners tell me if it comes with rewiring instructions?

                            Thanks,
                            Vinh
                            Vinh, based on extensive research on the matter, the rewire is more hassle than it's worth - in fact the worth appears to be zero. I know this is a debate nearing religous proportions (and not well suited for this forum) but I mention it because getting into the motor housing is sort of a pain on this one. I researched a TON on this subject when I bought mine and all the actual proof confirms no benefit to a rewire. There is anecdotal reports that rewiring is better but no proof that I could find. So, unless you have an overloaded circuit or a very long run, a standard dediated 20 amp 120v circuit will work exactly the same as a 220 rewire. So, IMO not worth the time for this saw. Unless you want to do it just for kicks. To the point, however, I did not find any instructions with the saw for the rewire but a wiring diagram may be on the motor inside the wiring housing.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Hi Tim - I agree with you on one point, and disagree with two.

                              FWIW, I found the rewiring on this motor to be easy and straight forward...a 5 minute job. Just bevel the motor toward the access door and it's easy to reach.

                              I agree that a motor wired for 110v(aka 120v) and 220v(aka240v) will have identical performance....in theory...but that assumes a theoretically perfect voltage supply, which of course is non-existent to most of us. It's true that voltage losses from underrated wire and long runs in 110v can be improved by using 220v, but even if the wiring is sufficient and doesn't cause significant losses on a 110v circuit, there can still be voltage swings (specifically voltage drops) caused solely by the electrical grid supplying the circuit. A voltage drop of somewhere in the range of 11v is ~ a 10% drop on the 110v circuit, while the same loss is only a 5% drop on a 220v circuit, which in turn causes less heat and efficiency losses during operation on the 220v circuit....no matter what actual voltage the loss may be, it's always half that on the 220v circuit. There are other advantages too...the value of which are debateable, like current spikes at startup, and faster starts, etc, but I think the "percentage of loss" argument is fairly objective. I think most people will find the conversion to 220v is more helpful than harmful, assuming no wiring errors are made.
                              Last edited by Knottscott; 05-01-2006, 02:52 PM.
                              Happiness is sort of like wetting your pants....everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth.

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