Stop me from sacrilege!

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  • Stop me from sacrilege!

    Ok. Here’s the issue. I am in a small 10x10 ish shop and have to move my saw around a lot. I’m finding that I’m bashing my fingers often because the rail for the smt hits on benches and such. I’m contemplating cutting the rail on an extra smt that I have so I can retain the table space and get rid of that extra 6 inches of awkward aluminum hanging off the front.
    I seldom use the slider so I’ll keep the one I’ve tuned up just in case. I’d really like to find another router top for it and not cut it up a good slider. Click image for larger version

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  • #2
    I think the ideal solution would be to find another auxillary table for it, but in the end, it's your saw so do with it what you will.

    Have you considered making an extension table for it that can be removed if necessary? The plan at the link below could be easily tweaked to make it removable without tools or if you really don't intend to use the slider much at all, make it semi-permanent.

    https://www.sawdustzone.org/articles...xtension-table
    Chr's
    __________
    An ethical man knows the right thing to do.
    A moral man does it.

    Comment


    • LCHIEN
      LCHIEN commented
      Editing a comment
      Ah, good link, it's Rod Kirby's table and details how its made and attached.

  • #3
    Some people turn the SMT around 180 degrees with the protrusion out the back when not using the SMT, in order to prevent the problem you are having with bashing your hips or other body parts. This assumes you have room behind the saw for this. It will fit on the rails reversed.

    Another option is to take the SMT off and store it somewhere, and buy a cheaper and simpler spare Auxiliary/router table section and mount it in place of the SMT when you are not using the SMT but need to support work to the left of the blade. They seem to go for about $30 to 70 bucks here an on eBay. Grumpydad here sells some.

    A yet cheaper alternative is to simply made a wooden equivalent of the Auxiliary table that mounts to the rails to match the height of the main table for support. You may or may not need to be able to clamp it to the rails to lock it in place. I think probably not. If you look in the archives here you can see people who have made wide table extensions when using extended rail extrusions to support cutting large sheets. You need a wide table extension that is short (not so wide). This is the wide table extension made by Rod Kirby, details at this link. https://www.sawdustzone.org/articles...xtension-table
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    The thing about the BT3 rail system is that its very adaptable to all kinds of DIY accessories with T-slots top and back and bottom
    You can even let gravity hold it in place for this purpose. You need to think about how to match the height and make it adjustable if you can't match it exactly.
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    Hope that helps.
    Last edited by LCHIEN; 01-02-2023, 11:27 AM.
    Loring in Katy, TX USA
    If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
    BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

    Comment


    • #4
      We all get caught up I wanting a large table saw in our shop. In your 10 x 10 shop there is no room on your saw for extended tables. I use a number of miter slot sleds on my saw that would almost completely eliminate the need of the smt. I still use a track saw when I have to cut up large pieces.

      Comment


      • LCHIEN
        LCHIEN commented
        Editing a comment
        He's not really wanting an extended table. He only wants the protrusion of the SMT to be out of the way. The suggestion for extension tables is only to replace the SMT with a short extension which is not an extension at all, just a table filler as an alternative to a aux table.

    • #5
      Thanks guys! I hadn’t thought about making my own table. A third accessory table would be the easiest way to go so I’ll keep my eyes open at garage sales. That’s where I found the extra smt. In the meantime I think I have the hardware I need to do what I want. I’ll post pics as it goes. It’ll be cool to have two routers in my table at that.

      Comment


      • #6
        Is turning the SMT 180 not the easiest?
        Loring in Katy, TX USA
        If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
        BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

        Comment


        • twistsol
          twistsol commented
          Editing a comment
          Not necessarily. If the saw is stationary, then you don't walk into it as often, but if you're moving it around, you just end up moving the problem to the other side of the saw.

      • #7
        Leave the SMT intact, and just remove it. Build a left side table support like LCHIEN shows above. No damage to the saw, and you can roll back if you chose to sell the saw, or end up in a larger shop space.
        Please like and subscribe to my YouTube channel. Please check out and subscribe to my Workshop Blog.

        Comment


        • #8
          So far I’ve moved my extra accessory table to the left side. I’ll be watching for another parts saw to show up nearby.
          thanks guys! I’d feel bad about chopping up a usable part that way.

          Comment


          • #9
            When I had a 12'x12' shop, I was always bumping the SMT and moving it out of alignment. I have four accessory tables. Since I was always having to realign it, I got into the habit of removing the SMT when I wasn't needed and just going through the steps to realign it when putting it back on. Even with my new 12'x22' shop, I still move my saw over to a wall if it gets in the way for something I'm doing. I think you'll ruin the usability of the SMT by cutting the slide shorter. Just today, I had to cross cut a 22' wide piece and used every inch of the slide on the SMT. Yes, the stock SMT miter fence won't do 22", but I made second fence that mounts on the front end of the SMT table to give 24" of crosscut. Cutting the slide would reduce that ability.
            Jim Frye
            The Nut in the Cellar.
            ”Sawdust Is Man Glitter”

            Comment


            • Dedpedal
              Dedpedal commented
              Editing a comment
              You’ve got the right idea. I’m going to save the smt and store it until I need it. Right now I have two accessory tables on it. Kinda kicking myself for not thinking of it sooner.

          • #10
            There is a locking device on the front edge of the SMT that locks the sliding portion to be "even" with the main table when you are not using the slide function.
            There are actually two locking slots on the SMT base that engage the lock IIRC. The second lock position (about an inch away) is so that the SMT is even with the main table when the SMT is reversed.

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            Last edited by LCHIEN; 01-03-2023, 12:00 AM.
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

            Comment


            • #11
              The last suggestion is be careful when handling and moving the SMT off the saw. Its easy and happens a lot that the locking levers get broken off when you drop it.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - https://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/di...sked-questions

              Comment


              • #12
                All,I need is another accessory table. This will do the job for now. My biggest problem with removing the smt was that my sleds weren’t as supported on the left side and sometimes they tilt if I put weight on that side. Click image for larger version

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                Comment


                • LCHIEN
                  LCHIEN commented
                  Editing a comment
                  by sleds, you mean rails?

                • Dedpedal
                  Dedpedal commented
                  Editing a comment
                  No, the crosscut sled and 45 sled are the biggest culprits. Without support on the left side they tend to tip if I put pressure there.
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