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  • Sharpening Jigs

    I'm looking into sharpening jigs. I'm leaning towards the wolverine jig with the Varigrind attachment for around $140 on Amazon. I see PSI has a very similar system for $130, but with shipping, it's pretty much a wash.

    Any opinions on either? To me, the wolverine looks more "polished" and seems to be the de facto standard.

    I have the cheap HF 6" grinder--I know an 8" slow speed would be much better, but one step at a time...
    Joe

  • #2
    Joey, I have the PSI version and it works just fine but if all things were equal, The Wolverine is the original and would be an excellent choice. Woodcraft occasionally will have the Rikon slow-speed grinder on sale for $99 - watch for that it's a good deal, and you really want that or something similar for your sharpening.
    Bill in Buena Park

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    • #3
      I wonder if you could use the router speed controller from HF to slow down your grinder. Might worth a try.

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      • #4
        I have the wolverine. works great.
        Jon

        Phoenix AZ - It's a dry heat
        ________________________________

        We all make mistakes and I should know I've made enough of them
        techzibits.com

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        • #5
          Originally posted by trungdok View Post
          I wonder if you could use the router speed controller from HF to slow down your grinder. Might worth a try.
          Most grinders I think have a induction motor and you can't use a router speed controller for that... they're only for universal motors.
          You can often tell a universal motor because it will have a couple of caps on it where you can access the brushes.
          Induction motors don't have brushes

          Loring in Katy, TX USA
          If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
          BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

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          • #6
            I did try the router speed control and Loring is, of course, correct. It didn't work.

            I've been debating this topic all week. After posting this topic, I did some more research and decided to just make my own--it's simple enough and I had already decided 2017 would be the year I try to make my shop budget neutral--sure it's a daring goal, but selling small items in LOML's Etsy shop has helped. I just don't want to keep spending. That, and I could put that money towards a slow speed grinder.

            ​​​​​​​THEN...PSI puts their version of the jig at 20% off until Wednesday. So much for not spending, lol. I'll have more time to build actual projects this way, too.
            Joe

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            • #7
              Usually handheld equipment uses universal motors - hand drills, routers, etc.

              Benchtop and stand-mounted equipment uses induction motors, because they are quite a bit larger and heavier, among other reasons. Like benchtop grinders, benchtop drill presses; Table saws (but not our BT3s!), jointers.

              Only universal motors can be controlled with a router speed controller. Well, light bulbs and heaters, too. But not induction motors.
              Last edited by LCHIEN; 03-13-2017, 12:40 AM.
              Loring in Katy, TX USA
              If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
              BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

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              • #8
                Joey, I don't have any regrets over buying the PSI jig. it's affordable and it's been very serviceable - I think you'll like it. Tell us what you think when you get it set up.
                Bill in Buena Park

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                • #9
                  IMHO, the PSI system is a cheap knock off of the Wolverine system. There were some legal challenges a few years ago about PSI knocking off Wolverine's design. I don't know what became of it, but apparently the matter was resolved.
                  That said, I use a Wolverine system on a high speed grinder. There is no need whatsoever in buying a slow speed grinder.
                  You would be better off investing in some decent grinding wheels than another grinder.
                  I use the blue Norton wheels. I have never had any problems burning my tools because of using a high speed grinder.

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                  • #10
                    I looked at a video of the wolverine system and also of the Tormek system. Since I have the Tormek nock off in the Grizzly, I bought the former SVD 186 tool sharpener. While it was created for fingernail grinds it does other on that tool also. After looking at videos for both, the former did seem a bit easier (in my mind's eye) for turning tool grinds.

                    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1
                    Hank Lee

                    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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                    • #11
                      Know I'm late to the party buy I'll tell you what I have. I was one of the early adopters of a BT3000. Had a BT3000 or 3100 for many years in my shop (even built a dual saw Frankensaw). I moved on to a Sears zip code saw, brand no Uni, track saw only, and then 1950 Uni. Last couple of years I have been trying to become a turner. My sharpening station includes: Rikon 1HP slow speed grinder, Wolverine set up, CBN wheels, and Robo Rest. A little while back I was able to have a one day hands on class with Stuart Batty at a local turner's club. For bowl turning he showed us how to grind and use a 40/40 grind. This is a free hand grind that takes a bit of practice to perfect. It is done with a platform - not a jig.

                      Mike

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