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  • Two New Tools

    Found a Craftsman 14" band saw and a Ryobi router table with a Craftsman router on CL for $310. Is this a decent price, or too high? I'm ok with it. They are nice and clean.

  • #2
    The Craftsman BS apparently goes for $470 new by itself so seems like an OK deal to me, assuming good condition and such.. Congrats on the new tools.

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    • #3
      Photos? Stamped steel frame or cast!

      Band saws, regardless of the brand, should last a long time unless they are abused. Unlike routers and some table saws they operate at much slower speeds with the motor humming along at 1100-1200 rpm. The 2 wheels are pretty much balanced and operate much slower than the motor so they seldom have bearing problems. The tires on the wheels are about the only thing that wears out occasionally, they should be replaced when you get the machine so you start off without tracking problems caused by tires. I've never seem an old Craftsman band saw with really good, acceptable maybe, but not great blade guides. I'd recommend installing bearing blade guides whenever you can. Carter has a retrofitblade guides for lots of Sears and Craftsman saws. They make a world of difference in the way the saw operates.

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      • #4
        I think that's a great buy! If considered separately, $250 for the bandsaw and $60 for the router/table combo, I'd've bought 'em too. If the bandsaw is the one in the link, it's got 8 inch resaw (so more than a 14inch Delta without a riser block). +1 on new tires and guides, unless the current ones are new and in great shape.
        This 1-Horsepower 14-inch Band Saw Has Some Serious Kick With its 1 HP dual 120/240 voltage motor and nearly 100-inch blade length...
        Last edited by Bill in Buena Park; 04-12-2017, 01:03 PM.
        Bill in Buena Park

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        • #5
          The bandsaw is one of the older ones that is shaped like the Deltas. It is cast iron, with cast iron table, miter slide and very small aluminum fence, Not a scratch on it. Needs new tire on top so will replace both, Craftsman router and A25RT02 table look like new as well. Ended up payin $240 for both. Will post pics if I can figure out how to do it.

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          • #6
            Where is the best place to get tires, cooling blocks and bearing blade guides? And what brands? Thanks

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            • #7
              carterproducts.com has tires and guides for most any band saw. I wish I had opted for the micro adjust guides when I purchased the regular bearing guides, I saved a few bucks but wish I had the easy adjust guides every time I change bands.

              Cool blocks are band guides.

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              • #8
                Mine has two little cube shaped blocks above the table and two below which I thought were the cooling blocks and it has a round bearing above the top blocks next to the blade That I thought was the bearing blade guide. Am I wrong?

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                • #9
                  The bearing behind the band is a thrust bearing, still should be considered a blade guide since it has to be adjusted each time the size is changed. The cool blocks are also called blade guides. Bearing blade guides are just nice upgrade acessories that you can really do without spending the money on. You can't skimp on the replacement tires though. Tires are expensive for what they are, just a piece of rubber (urethane for the good ones) that fits tightly around the wheels. At least they don't fail quickly. I Investigatied making my own tires but decided against it when I found out I would have to buy a several hundred dollar roll of belting.

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                  • #10
                    Although there are many configurations on how to guide the blade (using so-called blocks or bearings), the usual configuration is that the side-to-side guides are metal stock, often looking like shaft-key blocks. These are usually square in shape with a length of a half-inch or so depending on the size of the saw. They are used to restrain the side to side movement of the blade and are usually positioned so that they set in the middle of the back portion of the blade (that area of the blade between the bottom of the tooth gullet and the back edge of the blade). The blocks are adjusted to be within a few thousands of an inch on each side of the blade... I recall reading that the space between the blade and the block should be about the thickness of a dollar bill. "Cool blocks", use a ceramic-like material which, as I understand it, which is a much better material for friction-caused heating.

                    Directly behind the blade is a roller bearing, referred to as the "thrust" bearing. This bearing is often (especially on older band saws) positioned so the back of the blade, if pushed back by the stock being fed, would contact the side of the bearing near it's outer surface. The thrust bearing is adjusted to be just behind the back edge of the blade, but not actually touching it. It's purpose is to stop the blade from being pushed (or thrust) backwards by the stock being fed. Without the thrust bearing or on a bearing that is not properly positioned, the act of feeding might cause the blade to be pushed back to a point where the blade teeth could strike the blocks.

                    On newer designs (and some of the older more expensive designs), roller bearings are used instead of blocks. Similarly, the thrust bearing may be positioned so that the actual roller surface (like a tire) is behind the blade.... a much more sensible (IMO) position than having the bearing side used.

                    Adjustment of both the blocks and thrust bearing is very important. While you do want to have just enough clearance to do the job of restraining the blade from too much side-to-side movement or to be pushed back so far as to damage the teeth, you also do not want them to be tight and in contact with the blade, which would cause both wear on the blade and bearing, but also drag on the motor. Proper clearance is important. The side-to-side clearance is easily established, as you can feel the blade being pinched while trying to advance it manually. For the thrust bearing, just take note that when running free, that bearing should not be rotating. Contact with the thrust bearing should only be noticed when you feed stock into the blade.

                    CWS
                    Think it Through Before You Do!

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                    • #11
                      If you don't have much experience with a band saw, beware. Band saws are quiet running and not as intimidating as some power equipment. All adjustments to a band saw must be done with the power off. Don't let this smooth quite running saw fool you, It will cut off your fingers off just as fast as a table saw will!

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                      • #12
                        Probably a lot more efficiently too. Perhaps that's why you'll find band saws in butcher shops!

                        However, I've found the band saw to be a lot safer to use than many other power tools, especially my table saw and my radial arm saw or any other 'circular' saw. Just don't put your hand or fingers in front of the blade when feeding stock and keep that blade guard adjusted down as close to the stock as possible.

                        I keep my blade guard down to within a quarter-inch of the stocks surface for most cuts. First it protects me aas much as possible from exposure to the blade; and second, it optimizes the blades support by the closing the gap between the upper and lower blade guides, thus minimizing the chance of twisting (and possibly breaking) the blade, as well as other blade movement. The closer the guides are to each other, the better the blade's stability and tracking on the cut, given proper blade tension.

                        CWS


                        Think it Through Before You Do!

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                        • #13
                          A number of times I've caught myself reaching around the saw to adjust the guide bar height, reaching under the table to remove a piece of debris etc, and realize the saw is running. Carelessness on my part and really a good way to loose a large chunk of meat. It makes my skin crawl thinking about how close I was to the moving blade! It takes concentration to be safe.

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                          • #14
                            Have had my saw about a couple of weeks now with a broken tire. Got new urethane ones coming tomorrow. Got to go to Little Rock for a doctors appointment so I'm sure will get a good report and when I get home can start working on my new to me saw. Really looking forward to a great weekend in the Sawdust Saw Shop.

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                            • #15
                              Got my new tires today and put them on, tuned 'er up with all adjustments made. Runs like a sewing machine. Perfect. It is really a nice piece of equipment, especially for the price. Can't wait to get started on my first project.

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