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Purple Heart in Cutting Boards

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  • Purple Heart in Cutting Boards

    Does anyone have any information about using Purple Heart in a cutting board?

    Many thanks for the help, regards, Steve.

  • #2
    According to my toxic wood list, the dust can cause nausea (though I personally haven't ever had trouble working with it). Also, you'll need to treat with a UV inhibitor if you want to maintain the purple color, so the food-grade quality could suffer there also. Not sure I would risk it, unless the cutting board is only for show.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Uncle Cracker View Post
      According to my toxic wood list, the dust can cause nausea (though I personally haven't ever had trouble working with it). Also, you'll need to treat with a UV inhibitor if you want to maintain the purple color, so the food-grade quality could suffer there also. Not sure I would risk it, unless the cutting board is only for show.
      If the person you are making the cutting board for induces nausea from their cooking, 1+1 = big trouble

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      • #4
        If my memory is correct, Marc Spagnuolo (aka the Wood Whiserer) used purple heart in his. He also makes mention about safety of glue and finish, and advises against blank walnut for nut allergies.
        I think his site is www.thewoodwhisperer.com

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        • #5
          My dad made some cutting boards with purple heart and he'll never do it again. it was very difficult to work with as an end grain and wanted to splinter along with nearly destroying his friends drum sander.
          Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work. - Thomas Edison

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          • #6
            Hmmmm . . . lots of different opinions about purple heart and its suitability for cutting boards.

            Here's a link to the article mentioned by jgrobler: http://thewoodwhisperer.com/episode-...-above-part-1/

            And one that specifically says that it is not toxic: http://chowhound.chow.com/topics/321927

            I looking at the wood toxicity list mentioned by Uncle Cracker, purple heart is about as 'toxic' as walnut, but causes nausea rather than skin or respiratory sensitivity. (List attached.)

            A Google search reveals lots of sites that use purple heart, both in face-grain and end-grain applications.

            So what's a guy to do? Cogitate!

            Regards, Steve
            Attached Files

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            • #7
              I used some in a cutting board. It is a bit difficult to work, but not THAT bad. I didn't have massive chipout or anything, and certainly my drum sander did not have issue with it.

              Can't say about toxicity, as it was said to be ok, thus why I used it.
              Keith Z. Leonard
              Go Steelers!

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              • #8
                I have an end grain cutting board/portable island in the plans for a furture project. My wife needs one at a height to work at from her wheel chair.

                I have a Maple kitchen work table made from a recycled shuffleboard top that will be the main wood. I have been picking up pieces of other hardwoods to add in. I have a couple of pieces of 12/4 Cherry along with a few other tight grained woods, including some Walnut. Since Purpleheart is her favorite wood there will be some in the mix for contrast.
                Don, aka Pappy,

                Wise men talk because they have something to say,
                Fools because they have to say something.
                Plato

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                • #9
                  I've made three of the Wood Whisperer's Purpleheart/Maple end grain cutting boards. The Purpleheart does splinter a bit, but nothing that can't be dealt with. I kept one board for myself and gave the others to relatives. Haven't heard any complaints about any sickness/nausea.
                  Mike

                  Drywall screws are not wood screws

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