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  • Water patches on ceiling

    It has been raining quite a lot in south Florida, and this evening we saw a bunch of watch patches appear on the ceiling of one of our bedrooms. Look new (don't recall seeing it yesterday), and growing - there were 5 patches of 4" to 8" size, then another similar appeared an hour later in the living room.

    I should be calling a roof repair guy tomorrow as I have no experience or knowledge of doing this myself - but does this sound expensive? A quick google tells me to expect around $1000, and that's not reassuring (because with my luck, the actual estimate/cost might be much more...)

    Built in 2001, we are living in this home since 2005 and this is the first sign of roof leak.
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
    - Aristotle

  • #2
    Is there an attic space you can access to check out the problem yourself? Have you walked the outside of your house to see if shingles have blown off over the sections of leaks? Is the living room downslope of that bedroom on the roofline? Maybe the leak is happening up high and the water is rolling/dripping on the underside of the roof starting at that bedroom and then to your LR. I would personally try to diagnose this myself so when I do hear the problem and the cost, it wouldn't be a shock.

    I don't know what the SOP would be up here if this happened in regards to insulation. If there is insulation, it would surely be soaked. I might be inclined to move it away from the affected areas and then let heat in the attic dry it out.

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    • #3
      All great points, that I can do now, thanks for the suggestions.
      There's no attic space for any practical purposes - it's literally crawl space filled with insulation. But lemme still try and reconnaissance it today.
      It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
      - Aristotle

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      • #4
        Roof leaks are very hard to locate,from the attic. Yes you can see where the water is dripping in, but that doesn't mean that is where it penetrated the roof. It penetrated,the roof at a missing shingle, nail that popped up or flashing and ran down the decking until it found another path toward earth( remember that gravity ?) it might travel all the way from the top of the roof and over several pieces of plywood until it finds that open joint, then it may follow a stud down and drip 30 feet from the actual damage.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
          Is there an attic space you can access to check out the problem yourself? Have you walked the outside of your house to see if shingles have blown off over the sections of leaks? Is the living room downslope of that bedroom on the roofline? Maybe the leak is happening up high and the water is rolling/dripping on the underside of the roof starting at that bedroom and then to your LR. I would personally try to diagnose this myself so when I do hear the problem and the cost, it wouldn't be a shock.
          Quick answers to above questions - the roof has tiles, and none are missing. The bedroom and living room are on opposite side downslopes.

          I had a guy out and got a quote from him. He crawled into the attic and pointed out 4 spots of leaks to me. He said the difficulty of repair was higher for my roof because (a) the tiles are screwed, not nailed down, and (b) the tiles are of slightly obsolete kind, so not easy to obtain just in case some are damaged when removing. (c) He would be opening the tiles all the way up from the top, down to the leak to check if any other spots needed attention.

          His quote lists the tasks as:

          REPAIR 4 LEAK AREAS THROUGHOUT TILE ROOF
          - Remove existing tiles and cut out underlayment papers over leaking areas down to wood decking
          - Inspect plywood decking, replace rotted wood and reinforce rotted trusses if necessary
          - Install one new layer of 30lb felt underlayment paper, mechanically fastened to wood decking
          - Install second layer of self adhering modified granulated cap sheet (peel and stick)
          - Seal off repair edge with 3 course seal (roof mastic, membrane, mastic), apply granules to prolong repair seal
          - Reinstall tiles over repair areas to match as close as possible to existing tiles
          - Remove debris from site upon completion.

          Notes: - All Materials and Labor included
          - Repairs come with a 1yr. Leak-Free Guarantee
          - This estimate only includes the above mentioned services and is good for 15 days

          TOTAL $2,925


          So the sticker price obviously blew past my hoped-for range of $1000, but now I am pondering a second opinion, and also, maybe I should check with insurance too; have never claimed anything before, but is this big enough to justify it? I have check my deductible and stuff, and even whether roof leaks are covered.
          Last edited by radhak; 07-24-2017, 02:12 AM.
          It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
          - Aristotle

          Comment


          • #6
            Radhak.... how old is this roof? You stated it was tile, I don't understand "apply granules to prolong repair seal" . I can't recall ever seeing granules used in a tille roof underlayment. I'd be leery of a hard money quote that said they would replace rotted owed and reinforce trusses without putting in an allowance. If you had truss problems you would more than likely be able to see it in the attic, and would have had a leak long time ago.
            I don't know when it happened but the tiles in most modern residential tile roofs is no longer the waterproof membrane. The tiles are there to protect the rubber membrane or asphalt papers from sun and wind damage. This rubber or asphalt membrane usually lasts 50+ years. Water commonly gets under these tiles and flows all the way down to the eaves on the membrane and exits out of weep holes located in the tile end caps. These holes haven't been plugged up by someone painting or caulking not knowing what they were for did they? Or maybe been stopped up by dirt daubers or some other insect? If anyone has replaced broken tiles they could have left unsealed holes in he waterproof membrane where the old screws were removed... a future place for leaks and rot.
            Be advised that anyone walking on the tiles will likely break some of them. A broken tile is not the end of the world, but something you really don't want as it will allow debris inside,and eventually stop up the weep holes.
            capncarl

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            • #7
              Good detail, Cap. He sorta told me somewhat the same - he believes the underlayment paper has tears causing the leaks. He can't confirm it till he removes the tile to take a look. He did show me the water actually leaking to underneath the membrane and dripping to the plywood beneath (it was raining when we were looking).

              I have a hard time adjusting to the price quoted - I guess I fell for the initial numbers some friend threw out, and started expecting the quote to be near abouts.

              I have decided against invoking insurance. As I read from others' experience, I might not get much, and also risk a red flag against the house.
              It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
              - Aristotle

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by radhak View Post
                Quick answers to above questions - the roof has tiles, and none are missing. The bedroom and living room are on opposite side downslopes.

                I had a guy out and got a quote from him. He crawled into the attic and pointed out 4 spots of leaks to me. He said the difficulty of repair was higher for my roof because (a) the tiles are screwed, not nailed down, and (b) the tiles are of slightly obsolete kind, so not easy to obtain just in case some are damaged when removing. (c) He would be opening the tiles all the way up from the top, down to the leak to check if any other spots needed attention.
                A couple of thoughts:
                - the self adhering cap sheet (ice and water shield) will not adhere well to the underlayment, manufacturer's say it should be applied directly to the wood decking. Around here that is also a code requirement. The felt does not seem necessary and can damage the cap sheet due to chemical interactions.
                - how big is the roof? You may find the cost to remove all the tile, put the ice and water shield over the decking, and replace the tile is not a whole lot more, and then you should get a reasonable warranty.
                - a 1 year warranty is really short for roof work, even for repairs.

                I think I would get another quote or two, try to find a personal recommendation for a contractor that does good work at reasonable cost. If you can't, try angies list for some ideas.
                --------------------------------------------------
                Electrical Engineer by day, Woodworker by night

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                • #9
                  I can't imagine taking a whole roof of tiles off without breaking a lot of them would be possible? If you do decide to go that do route, pick your contractor wisely, and make dang sure they get the wood deck absolutely clean of all dirt and debris because ice and water shield will not adhere well if it is dirty. You might even consider having it sanded first to remove the puckers caused by all the screws from the original roof. This is a job where you want your eyes on the entire job, not one that will be finished when you get home from work!
                  capncarl

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                  • #10
                    Great points, guys! I am looking for others (via Angie's list) for alternative quotes, and to clarify many points from here.
                    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
                    - Aristotle

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