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Stove Gas Line--What Size?

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  • Stove Gas Line--What Size?

    I am considering replacing my electric stove with a gas one. I have a 1/2" gas line running near the area, which serves the dryer. What size do stoves use?
    Joe

  • #2
    Most gas stoves I have seen use 3/4" gas line, but I don't know if that is standard. The manufacturer of your new stove will probably have some advice on this. Also, there are usually numerous codes in force regarding the materials and methods used for a gas connection, so I would recommend that you check with your local Building Dept. for their input.

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    • #3
      gas line size is based on the distance from the meter and other installed appliances. There are no rule of thumb sizing ideas that will work for sure because each application is different.. If you are using the dryer you can't put the stove on the same pipe. as you will have insufficient gas for either if the other is working and it will be against manufactures and code requirements. Your utility should be able to give you input.
      Art

      If you don't want to know, Don't ask

      If I could come back as anyone one in history, It would be the man I could have been and wasn't....

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      • #4
        I believe it also depends on the pressure you are getting. Like Art mentioned, your gas co should be able to advise you.
        Erik

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        • #5
          I recently went through a similar process in installing a gas line for a dryer. There are formulas available to calculate exact sizes, lengths, etc, but easier to find a table (many sources on internet- here's one: http://www.cityofgulfbreeze.com/natu...Guidelines.pdf

          The typical gas range uses 65,000 btu/hr, and a dryer 35,000 btu/hr, so if both are being used at the same time, you need to supply 100,000 btu/hr in the line. Natural gas, conveniently enough, contains 1000 btu per cubic ft, so you need to supply 100 cubic ft/hr (which are the units all the tables use).

          Looking at the tables, a 30' run of 1/2" steel pipe can supply 97 cu ft/hr, and a 20' run can provide 120 cu ft/hr, so ir your run is no more than 25' or so, you should be okay with current size.

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