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Router table finger joint jig

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  • Router table finger joint jig

    I saw the rockler router table finger joint jig in action and was impressed with its accuracy and overall fit of the joints. Has anyone built their own and been satisfied with the results?. I feel I could build one for less than what this rockler jig goes for. Any thoughts?
    Thanks.

  • #2
    I have coveted that jig for some time, and have a feeling it would be a great jig. I have not bought it yet because I did build myself one in the shop, and it worked pretty nicely, but then I stored it wrong somewhere and it broke (the miter-guide ripped off) and I have to get around to needing it again before I decide on the build-or-buy.

    The jig I built, took a bit of tweaking before I could use it - and I did not make it configurable - it could only make half-inch finger joints. The rockler one looks to have a range. Also, I like their design, seems more dependable than what I had built.

    If you are trying to make a decision, I'd say - go ahead and build one without over-thinking it. I've always found that going thru the process of building a jig and then using it, gives so much input to me, and I can always buy for the next time. And if I were you, I'd copy their design: you could use a strip of hard-wood instead of metal, or you could get a nice cheap piece of metal from HomeDepot pretty quickly. I daresay the material should not cost you more than $10-$12.
    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
    - Aristotle

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    • #3
      I built a finger joint jig simular to stubby nubbs earlier jig, using a 3/8-16 threaded rod. After you figure out how to use it, it creates perfect finger joints. I think that stubbys jig that is out now would be even better, and cost a heap less than Rockler.
      I built my jig so it would cut a stack of parts at one time, probably 10 drawer sides, rather than doing each one individually.
      That said, i,seldom use it.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by capncarl View Post
        I built a finger joint jig simular to stubby nubbs earlier jig, using a 3/8-16 threaded rod. After you figure out how to use it, it creates perfect finger joints. I think that stubbys jig that is out now would be even better, and cost a heap less than Rockler.
        I built my jig so it would cut a stack of parts at one time, probably 10 drawer sides, rather than doing each one individually.
        That said, i,seldom use it.
        Was that a typo, and did you mean Stumpy Nubs? That's what I found on googling - and boy, is that a nice site! I had not known of them before, but I like it! I love the plan for the finger joint they demonstrate; I'll try and build that at the next opportunity. Thanks for pointing it out!
        It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
        - Aristotle

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        • #5
          Stubby wasn't a typo... it was the "all knowing" auto correct feature on my iPad! Yes, the Stumpy Nubs site is quite interesting, and has a lot of projects. I liked the capability of making various sizes of fingers in a finger joint rather than having all fingers the same size.

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          • #6
            Two of my favorite Canadians also built box joint jigs:

            https://youtu.be/LXAO7Zla44o

            https://youtu.be/UYcwWb0-evc
            Joe

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            • #7
              Originally posted by JoeyGee View Post
              Two of my favorite Canadians also built box joint jigs:

              https://youtu.be/LXAO7Zla44o

              https://youtu.be/UYcwWb0-evc
              I was thinking of building Mattias's version until I saw Johns. I like his better.

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              • #8
                I built this one. Works really well. It can be used on either the router table or table saw. I use mine on the table saw with a dado blade.

                http://www.woodworkingseminars.com/w...-joint-jig.pdf

                B
                "Why are there Braille codes on drive-up ATM machines?"

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                • #9
                  [QUOTE=capncarl;n830474]I built a finger joint jig simular to stubby nubbs earlier jig, using a 3/8-16 threaded rod. After you figure out how to use it, it creates perfect finger joints. I think that stubbys jig that is out now would be even better, and cost a heap less than Rockler.
                  I built my jig so it would cut a stack of parts at one time, probably 10 drawer sides, rather than doing each one individually.
                  That said, i,seldom use now

                  Thanks, Capncarl.
                  I too, had never heard of stubby. I like his design very much.

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                  • #10
                    I don't use theis finger joint jig on a router table, I use it on the table saw. It was originally built and used on my Craftsman BT saw but later converted to the accept the miter slots in my Powermatic. I found that cutting a stack of drawer box parts with a straight cut router bit caused too much tear out. Now I use a box joint blade in the table saw..

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                    • #11
                      I got lucky and found a really good deal on Incra I-box on eBay. Works really good but retail is very pricey. I would never have paid full retail for it. The Rockler jig seems very well built as well.
                      I reject your reality and substitute my own.

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                      • #12
                        I've got to drag my box joint jig out and update it. Currently it is the 1/16" per crank type with a ruler scale for reference. Until you learn how to use it you can mess up as much wood as you cut right, and those learnings are lost if you don't use it often, which I don't.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by capncarl View Post
                          I don't use theis finger joint jig on a router table, I use it on the table saw. It was originally built and used on my Craftsman BT saw but later converted to the accept the miter slots in my Powermatic. I found that cutting a stack of drawer box parts with a straight cut router bit caused too much tear out. Now I use a box joint blade in the table saw..
                          Capncarl, I have a question for you.
                          What's your thoughts on routing a groove to accept the universal t track on a fence either for a router table, TS or bandsaw jig on the actual fence facing the work or have seen some guys will install the track on top edge facing the user. Is the track on the top edge for stop blocks only?

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                          • #14
                            UPS1990.....I think that using the whole rip fence as a jig guide rather than using a t track that is mounted on the fence is better way to guide a jig. I use my tablesaw fence a lot for jigs rather than the miter slots in the table top. It is ideal for any jig that has to move parallel to the blade where a miter slot would not allow it and you would have to readjust your jig. The track on the fence is better used to position stop blocks, guides, shields and vacuum pickups. I've found that the miter slots in the table guide a jig very well but a jig that relies on a t track mounted on something like a fence or stop block on a jig doesnt slide true enough. For a router table where there usually isn't a miter slot nearby, a rip fence mounted jig is ideal.
                            Photo of my table leg tapering jig that uses the rip fence as a guide. Note that the aluminum square pieces are actually a jig sold as a tapering jig and are meant to slide against the rip fence with the wood being held in place by the operators fingers. Waaaay too dangerous for fingers. The fixture is adjustable so I can compensate for wear and tear on the rip fence and slides well.

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