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Walnut plywood kitchen stools

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  • Walnut plywood kitchen stools

    Decided to make barstools from walnut plywood by first making a template from MDF. The template build took longer to make than what I'd had initially planned. I searched the web for images of plywood stools but had no succes and so I took some ideas from " The Drunken Wodworker" video on Baltic birch plywood stools. This project took too long mainly because I wanted the joinery to be strictly dowels and glue, NO screws or nails. Dowel joinery is easier when its end to end but I'm not as experienced at the 90degree tapered corners these stools presented. I feel that I wasted too much material by leaving such a big face opening in my design. For the finish, I'm leaning towards General Finshes.

  • #2
    I like the clean simple design. Are you going to stain or laminate the plywood edges of the finished product or leave with the contrasting colors?

    As to dowels, I used to make things from dowels years ago and loved it. If I had a Domino, it would be my construction of choice now. For the most part, I use Kreg pocket hole and glue for most joinery now. I think and think on my projects to the point that even the pocket holes (even filled in) are not visible from anywhere but the back or bottom or top of a cabinet. In the case of a kitchen stool like that, there is no way to use the pocket holes without them being seen, which would make me use a different method.

    Great looking design.
    Hank Lee

    Experience is what you get when you don't get what you wanted!

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    • UPS1990
      UPS1990 commented
      Editing a comment
      I'm going to leave the exposed visible edges as is. I like the contrast against the walnut. You are correct, pocket holes is much faster but didn't want any holes to show on the inner panels.

  • #3
    That's pretty neat.

    GF​​​ Endurovar on walnut looks good. Do very light coats with a foam brush because it does run on vertical surfaces. Only very light sanding is needed between coats but use a strong angled light to inspect your work as you brush because sometimes it doesn't seem to "stick" in spots that didn't get sanded well enough. The first one or two coats will raise the grain. Endurovar adds a pleasing amber hue to walnut.

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    • UPS1990
      UPS1990 commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the suggestion. Do you go with 400-500 grit between coats?

  • #4
    Nah. I've just stayed with 220.

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