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  • Recent woodworking projects

    Hi all, had some time to get some woodworking done, maybe not in the truest sense, but its wood and its work ;-)

    I converted the oldest child's changing table into a computer desk. The molding on the bottom was quite tricky, in the end I marked and cut and hoped for the best knowing that we had already gotten our money's worth out of the unit. Took out the upper swing out drawers and the lower drawers, webbing, etc. Used the slats from his old crib side rails and the lower rails to finish off some rough edges and voila.

    Click image for larger version  Name:	20161115_142018_zpszdplbyxu.jpg Views:	1 Size:	462.5 KB ID:	828279





    The other project was to make some economical floating shelves, they had to be floating, at least 5', look nice..... in other words, custom made but do it for nothing. I think we all excel at that here no?!
    2x12 from HD cut in 1/2, some recycled finish I had laying around, some blotching, but so what, its pine and I wasn't going to be able to take the time to build up a surface finish where I could completely control the blotch.... cheap,fast or good comes to mind. Couldn't have been all that bad, SWMBO wants another, shelves should be in three's she says...

    Any easy way of embedding more than one photo??
    Last edited by chopnhack; 11-26-2016, 11:48 PM.
    I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

  • #2
    Hey, good to see you around! I like the repurposed table. Waste not, want not.

    I can't see the floating shelf pics, though, when I follow your link. If you click on the underlined "A" icon, you should see a picture icon. You can link to your photobucket pics there. It hasn't been a problem for me to link to multiple pics this way.

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    • #3
      Nice work, I also like to re-purpose furniture and keep an eye out for yard sales where I might find good candidates. I would very much like to see your floating shelves if you can get the photos posted. How did you fashion the wall brackets?
      Jon

      Phoenix AZ - It's a dry heat
      ________________________________

      We all make mistakes and I should know I've made enough of them
      techzibits.com

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      • #4
        Thanks gents, good to be around ;-) I had a re-occurrence of one of my first hobbies, electronics and spent the last two years mostly focused on that. Oddly what spurred it was wanting to construct a time delayed relay to turn my d.c. on when my tools operate. I know they make them, but I wanted one that I could plug my 240 and 120 devices into and if there was sufficient current on either side (120 or 240 tool) there would be a delay followed by the d.c. starting, as well as a delay when the tool was turned off. Works like a charm. I will dig up some photos.

        First, lets see if I can get a pic up of the shelves:



        Ah!!! Thank you Paul! LOL

        The hidden bracket is a 4' long section of 1/4" thick bar stock, 1" wide. I drilled five 5/8" holes evenly spaced along the length, several inches in from either end and being mindful of stud layout. I used a scrap piece of plywood first to layout my location starting from the right corner, noted where studs where and used that as my story pole. Into the 5/8" holes I welded round bar stock of the same diameter. Routed the backside of the 2x12 after jointing it and laying out the holes. The wood was acclimated to the house for about 2 months before I started this since its construction lumber. I had thought of using plywood with wood banding in a torsion box arrangement, but the 2x12 seemed to be the cheaper route. I also didn't think the grain match would be good enough for it to look like a solid plank.

        As for the auto on/off dust collector gizmo, it was a collaborative work between myself and a friend who has since past on, RIP Kris! Luckily he got me to the point of a fully designed board which I was left to program. Here is a pic of the board after I populated it and some other pics of it being wired into the garage. I bet Loring would like it






        The left top 110v recept. is the switched socket to the dust collector, the bottom 110v and both 220v recepts are the triggering outlets, plug any device into those three and if the draw is above my minimum (specified by program code, so I can change) the program runs and d.c. switches on.
        I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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        • #5
          That is some serious looking electronics for your DC!

          If I'm reading the description of your floating shelf design, you also bore 5/8" holes in the shelf to slide over the rods. We have some IKEA floating shelves that use that method, too. They also have a set screw in the shelf over the rod so once the shelf is slid on to the bracket, you can tighten down the set screw and the shelf can't slide off.

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          • #6
            Triggered outlet looks very neat and professional.
            And looks great the way its packaged.
            I'd put some P-Touch labels on the front so you or your successors don't get confused down the road ... ""DC" and "TOOL" at least.
            Is it programmable if you ever get a 240V DC? or is the controlled outlet only ever 120?
            Loring in Katy, TX USA
            If your only tool is a hammer, you tend to treat all problems as if they were nails.
            BT3 FAQ - http://www.sawdustzone.org/forum/dis...sked-questions

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            • #7
              Originally posted by atgcpaul View Post
              That is some serious looking electronics for your DC!

              If I'm reading the description of your floating shelf design, you also bore 5/8" holes in the shelf to slide over the rods. We have some IKEA floating shelves that use that method, too. They also have a set screw in the shelf over the rod so once the shelf is slid on to the bracket, you can tighten down the set screw and the shelf can't slide off.
              Correct. I did the same, tapped a hole on either side after it was installed for safety sake.
              I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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              • #8
                Originally posted by LCHIEN View Post
                Triggered outlet looks very neat and professional.
                And looks great the way its packaged.
                I'd put some P-Touch labels on the front so you or your successors don't get confused down the road ... ""DC" and "TOOL" at least.
                Is it programmable if you ever get a 240V DC? or is the controlled outlet only ever 120?
                Thanks Loring, it was a lot of work, but well worth it. I intend to remove if from the wall and take it with me since I doubt the home inspectors would know what it was all about and probably red flag it as unsafe when time comes to move!
                240 DC is no issue, my components on the relay side are rated for 240 vac ;-) no programming changes would be necessary.
                I think in straight lines, but dream in curves

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                • #9
                  That was a fantastic use of recycled wood with sentimental value to boot! I'm a big fan of repurposing stuff.
                  The desk looks great.

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                  • #10
                    I missed this the first time around - that desk looks awesome!

                    Unfortunately the other pictures don't show now, drat! I wish chopnhack could update the link...
                    It is the mark of an educated mind to be able to entertain a thought without accepting it.
                    - Aristotle

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