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  • #16

    TABLE TOP CONSTRUCTION AND FABRICATION
    Time to build a tiny table top! First the bottom bevel. Each Tiny Table is unique. The size of the table top is determined by the wood chosen and its character. Generally the top size are around 18" long x 10" wide. When I find a really nice figured board that I hate to cut up the top size may be upwards of 28" long x 12" wide. Some table tops are as small as 12" long x 8" wide.
    The rectangular top is to be planed and sanded prior to cutting the bottom bevel.
    The bottom bevel is cut using a rip fence straddling table beveling jig that holds the top vertical. The top must be clamped secure with the table top facing the rip fence. The table saw blade is raised to cut 1 1/2" and tilted 8 degrees. The cut is angled toward the table bottom but does not cut through. This angle cut provides a step for the legs and aprons. Cut all 4 table top sides the same. Remove the table beveling jig. Set the table saw rip fence aprox. 1 1/2", blade set at 90 degrees and raise the blade enough to cut into the bottom to intersect with the angle cut. A little playing with the height and rip fence to sneak up on this cut intersection and this finishes the bottom bevel and leaves about 1/4" step and the bevel provides a nice thin table edge.
    If desired a similar bevel can be applied to the top edge of the table top. My favorite top bevel is about 4 degrees angle cutting away about 1 inch of table top. This is cut with the blade raised 1 1/2" - 2" to avoid the blade tip cutting a line into the top.
    WARNING this jig is a sawdust making machine so be prepared to clean up a mess, or not! Remember, sawdust is just man cave glitter!
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    Attached Files
    Last edited by capncarl; 10-30-2016, 09:21 PM.

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    • #17
      Photo of table top edge taper jig in action cutting bottom bevel.
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      Click image for larger version  Name:	image.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	117.5 KB ID:	828000
      Last edited by capncarl; 10-30-2016, 09:27 PM.

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      • #18
        Photo of table top edge taper jig in action cutting top bevel.
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        Last edited by capncarl; 10-30-2016, 09:28 PM.

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        • #19
          Photo of table top bottom bevel.
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          • #20
            Photo of table top top bevel.

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            • #21
              DETERMINING LEG PLACEMENT AND APRON LENGTHS

              The previous post showed table tops cut with a beveled bottom of 1 1/2" to leave a 1/4" to 3/8" thick edge. This sets the legs in about 1 3/4" which requires the desired angle on the legs. This angle works out to be about 4.5 degrees. To establish this angle, all 4 pron pieces, 2 long and 2 short have this angle cut on the ends. Note that the apron positions the legs under the table so it is best to measure this with the top upside down, place the legs where you want them, measure between the legs and use this to cut the aprons. Legs should not extend past the footprint of the top.

              Photo of table top with leg set to establish proper leg angle.

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              Photo to of table top with legs set in place for apron measurements

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              • #22


                CUTTING LEG ANGLE ON APRON

                To cut the apron length/angle I built a small table saw sled with a 4.5 degree jig and hold down clamps. I found this sled to be necessary to maintain the accuracy required and to safely hold the 2 small aprons. Using a miter gauge just got scary and wasted too much material. A sliding miter saw was first used but I didn't like the unreliability of the angles and the danger involved.

                Each apron length and 4.5 degree angle is cut on the the table saw sled. The table end apron pieces are short and should be held with a clamping fixture rather than by hand. Note that this cutting operation gets tricky keeping up with the bottom and top of the apron and can create quite a pile of scrap figuring it out. After cutting an apron I mark it on the sled so the next apron can be cut exactly the same.
                After all of the aprons are cut to length/angle the apron end mortise must be cut then a decorative scallop can be cut if desired. a decorative scallop can be cut if desired.

                Photo of table saw sled cutting apron length and angle. Click image for larger version  Name:	image.jpeg Views:	1 Size:	100.4 KB ID:	828033
                Last edited by capncarl; 10-31-2016, 11:53 PM.

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                • #23


                  CUTTING APRON MORTISES
                  A previous post described cutting mortises in the legs. The same method is used to cut mortises in each end of each apron. This is not a cut that I want to do by holding down a 3-4" piece of wood with my hand and cutting an end mortise with a Domino 500...... So as Norm would say, let's build a jig. This operation is easy but there is still a chance of cutting the mortise in the wrong side of the apron or register off the wrong face, so marking each apron top and outside face is suggested.

                  Photo of apron holding jig with mortise cut in the top of the apron.

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                  • #24
                    CUTTING APRON SCALLOPS

                    Tiny Table apron scallops are optional. Most tables end aprons are too short to scallop, and some do not have any scallop cutting on the long aprons bottoms, depends on the look desired. 90% of tables do have the long side aprons scalloped.

                    Table aprons are cut on an adjustable band saw jig with a hold down clamp.

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                    Attached Files

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                    • #25


                      FASTENING THE TABLE TOP TO THE LEG/APRON ASSEMBLY
                      I do not use conventional methods to fasten the top to the the leg assembly. Early Tiny Tables utilized table top blocks, Kreg pocket holes and small angle pieces. Nearly all of the negative comments I received from admirers and customers that really scrutinized the tables was about how the top was attached. The simple look of these tables was what everyone liked and fasteners and other hardware distracted from that look. Going against everything I've learned about building tables I started attaching the table tops directly to the aprons using dowels. No visible fasteners or hardware and now the critics can spend more time looking for my build flaws. I now use 5mm Festool Dominos rather than dowels for top fasteners. Time savings using dowels and dominos is great as using conventional methods was very hard considering the cramped work space on these small tables. The conventional table building wisdom that says the top must float on the aprons to allow for wood expansion and contraction probably doesn't apply that much with this narrow table top. I hope.

                      Photo of table top and leg/apron assembly with slots cut for dominos.

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                      • #26
                        FINISHED TINY TABLES
                        Photo of 6 Tiny Tables built during this instructional.

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                        • #27
                          These look just great. Its always hard to tell from the pics but how big are these?

                          One thing I did wonder is about that slight bevel on the top. Have some folks complained about it not being level across the whole top and it being an issue with a drink or plate that could tip if not flat?
                          Jon

                          Phoenix AZ - It's a dry heat
                          ________________________________

                          We all make mistakes and I should know I've made enough of them
                          techzibits.com

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                          • #28
                            TINY TABLES FINISH DISCUSSION
                            JON
                            The top bevel on these tables is only about 1/8" deep and 1" to 1 1/2" wide. And it WILL dump a glass of wine off on the floor if the glass is placed on this bevel...... but it is pretty!
                            I think that the bevel top tables are being purchased to be used with a nice tray to put your keys in, or to place your phone and tablet on. Some are being used with a small lamp on them. One lady said that if anyone put anything on her table she would quietly just throw it away, and another customer bought hers just to have a place for her pocket book and nothing else. Tables that are to have glasses of cups placed on them should have coasters in place to protect their finish. If the table is intended to be used for glasses and cups it probably should be built or purchased with a flat top.

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                            • #29
                              Very informative detailed tutorial discussions! Love the tables!

                              Sent from my SM-N920T using Tapatalk

                              _________________________
                              omar

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                              • #30
                                I thought this thread had vanished off the edge of the internet, I haven't seen it for a while,
                                On the last 3 sinker cypress tables that I built, after cutting the bottom bevel I lay the table top up and cut off the bevel cut. I "sneak" up on the bottom of the bevel with the rip fence adjustment, inspecting the cut each adjustment. I discovered by not hitting the bevel cut perfectly it leaves and nice little slot cut around the bottom of the base of the bevel. Hadn't thought of that before. Since I let the legs set inside the base about 3/16" the 1/8" slot adds a little something and makes it more challenging for those woodworking tire kicker customers that really inspect these tables to try and make them theirselves.

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